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Showing posts from August, 2014

Congratulations Alice Rolfes-Curl, Fine Arts Salon Winner!

BEST OF SHOW
Dye Trace HRWC
Mosaic by Alice Rolfes-Curl

SOURCE: NSS Facebook Page

Regional Coordinators Needed

Congratulations Candice Eagle, Fine Arts Salon Winner!

HONORABLE MENTION
Drippin' Bacon
Acrylic by Candice Eagle

SOURCE: NSS Facebook Page

Congratulations Carolina Payne Shrewsbury, Fine Arts Winner!

MERIT AWARD Solution Rift Pencil Sketch by Carolina Payne Shrewsbury
SOURCE: NSS Facebook Page

Congratulations Kelly Smallwood, Fine Arts Winner!

HONORABLE MENTION Photographic Composite by Kelly Smallwood 
SOURCE: NSS Facebook Page

Manager of Grants Volunteer Needed

Congratulations Cheryl Suitor, fine Arts Salon Winner!

HONORABLE MENTION
Around the Corner
Acrylic by Cheryl Suitor












HONORABLE MENTION
Paxtons Revisited
Acrylic by Cheryl Suitor

SOURCE: NSS Facebook Page

Jessica Deli

Jessica Deli has been Central Region Coordinator for the NCRC since 2012 but before then she had already made her mark as a rescue specialist and cave conservationist all over the US. Deli has been involved with the National Cave Rescue Commission since 2005. With a simple Google search you will find her name everywhere participating in cave rescue training efforts. She appeared in the New York Grotto 2008 report for the Cave rescue Seminar and 2013 Orientation to Cave Rescue. In 2006 Kansas City Grotto mentioned her in the Orientation to Cave Rescue at Indiana University. Central Indiana Grotto enjoyed her demos in 2012 at the club's Vertical training. At the 2011 NSS Convention she presented "Atmospheric Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide Levels in Caves: What is Normal? Preliminary Results" with Anmar Mirza. And in 2005 she was involved in the Buckner's Cave clean-up project at Indiana University Bloomington.

Deli's credentials in civilian life are impressive too! Th…

7 year old girl sways LEGO to make toys represent women in science

Months after a girl took the company to task for its female toy figures, Lego has released the Research Institute, a play set created by a "real-life geophysicist, Ellen Kooijman," the company says. The set will let kids take on the roles of paleontologist, astronomer and chemist, using three female figures. It might also satisfy some of the demands set forth earlier this year by Charlotte Benjamin, a 7-year-old who wrote a scathing letter to the company accusing its female characters of being boring. "I love Legos," Charlotte wrote. But, she continued, there aren't enough girls — and the ones the company has made just "sit at home, go to the beach, and shop," while the boy characters "saved people, had jobs, even swam with sharks!"
The girl's letter attracted widespread attention — and within a week, Lego responded, saying "we have been very focused on including more female characters and themes that invite even more girls to build…

Mary Gratch, Honorable Mention Award

Congrats Mary Gratch, Honorable Mention Award, 2014 NSS Photography Salon
SOURCE
NSS Facebook page

Dr Marion Dowd studies a Stone Age child found in a cave

Dr Marion Dowd comments on her research of bones of a Stone Age child and an adult found in tiny cave in Ireland

“It’s an enormously exciting discovery,” said Dowd of IT Sligo, Ireland’s only specialist in the archaeology of Irish caves.

The bones of a Stone Age child and an adult in a tiny cave high on Knocknarea mountain near the town have been radiocarbon dated to 5,500 years old, which makes them among the earliest human bones found in the county.

SOURCE
http://www.irishmirror.ie/news/irish-news/archaeologists-sligo-found-bones-stone-3193318

Vermont Cavers’ Association welcomes female reporter Margot Harrison underground

When Seven Days magazine challenged their reporters to go out and do a physical activity they’ve never done before, and write about it, female news reporter Margot Harrison bravely challenged herself to try caving and Ken Moore, president of the Vermont Cavers’ Association showed her much support and encouragement has she tried the sport. After this experience she wrote "The next day I would have hideous hip-and-shoulder bruises from the tight squeeze but would know for certain that I’m not claustrophobic. And some strange part of me would be itching to return to the underworld." Ken Moore thank you for welcoming another woman to the world of caving. Its cavers like you truly make a difference! SOURCE
m.sevendaysvt.com/vermont/seven-days-writers-go-outside-their-comfort-zones/Content?oid=2265654
Photos courtesy of Michael Fisher

Fan Letters

Aspen Marchington, an 8 year old honored extraordinary woman caver for this year wrote us a letter. Thanks Aspen. We always love hearing from you!

Children can enjoy caving too, finds Gary King, reporter for The Telegraph

King's children, nine-year-old Sebastian and six-year-old Bella, are picture here in hard hats, head torches and wellies. Follow the link to read his story about the children's underground adventure. SOURCE
www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/outdoors/outdoor-activities/5229721/Caving-down-to-earth.htmlPicture by Rei Schroer

Woman caver escapes death as a car falls over her into a 200 foot vertical Ukraine cave

In January 2013 a car fell into a Ukraine cave killing one person and injuring two others. The article does not explain how the vehicle fell into cave. It's a miracle that only one person died. After witnessing two people in her caving party be disconnected by the falling vehicle, a 20 year old woman caver manages to climb 33 foot assent out of the cave and seek rescue. The bravery of this young woman to go on after witnessing such a tragedy is outstanding. The car injured her pelvis and shoulder and dicconnected her friends. It then descended down the 80 meter (262 foot) deep vertical  drop where two other cavers waited. At this time she may have believed that she was the only survivor. All four surviving members exited the cave with the help of Mountain Rescue of Crimea.
SOURCE
cavingnews.com/20130122-caver-dies-others-injured-after-vehicle-falls-into-cave-crimea
Photo by Mountain Rescue of Crimea

Amy E.

Peace Corps Volunteer Amy E. participated in caving expeditions with the Jamaican Caving Organization (JCO) and it impacted her life greatly. She wrote " I was unable to repel down into the Asuno because of the lack of my experience and also the size of the cave. The following day though, [JCO] lent me the required equipment to repel down my first cave. I was so nervous that I wanted to back out, but I’m brave and determined so I did it without hesitation. What a thrill it was too! I felt like I was on top of the world. I set my mind to it and I succeeded!  It was an adventure I’d remember and cherish for the rest of my life." SOURCE
doctorbird.wordpress.com/page/2/